More Evidence Emerges of Big Banks Abusing American Military Families

“Complaints that active military personnel and National Guard members were losing their homes while deployed in war zones set off national outrage and prompted Congressional hearings in 2011. The case of Sgt. James B. Hurley, a disabled veteran whose home outside Hartford, Mich., was sold two months before he returned from Iraq, dragged through the courts for years, highlighting the devastating effect of foreclosures.”

- From the recent New York Times article: Banks Find More Wrongful Foreclosures Among Military Members

The above is part of a very depressing theme I have covered in the past.  Most recently in my piece from last November titled:  Big American Banks Particularly Enjoy Ripping off Active Duty U.S. Soldiers.  Today’s post follows up on that one and what we find; unsurprisingly, is that the more you peer behind the curtain, the more filthy the whole thing becomes.  That’s precisely why the oligarchs don’t want anyone to peer behind the curtain for too long.  From the New York Times:

The nation’s biggest banks wrongfully foreclosed on more than 700 military members during the housing crisis and seized homes from roughly two dozen other borrowers who were current on their mortgage payments, findings that eclipse earlier estimates of the improper evictions.

Bank of America, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo uncovered the foreclosures while analyzing mortgages as part of a multibillion-dollar settlement deal with federal authorities, according to people with direct knowledge of the findings. In January, regulators ordered the banks to identify military members and other borrowers who were evicted in violation of federal law.

These four banks just keep popping up in criminal schemes don’t they?

The analysis, which was turned over to regulators in recent days, provides the first detailed glimpse into the extent of wrongful foreclosures amid the collapse of the housing market. While lenders previously acknowledged that they relied on faulty documents to push through foreclosures, the banks claimed borrowers were rarely evicted by mistake, including military personnel protected by federal law.

Housing advocates say the findings also underscore the broader flaws with the settlement. In the latest negotiations, according to people briefed on the talks, the banks secured favorable terms for doling out some aid, a deal that could diminish the relief to homeowners.

Dan Petegorsky, national outreach manager with an advocacy group, the Campaign for a Fair Settlement, described the terms as a “step backwards” for homeowners.

“Our initial reaction was stunned disbelief,” he said.

Complaints that active military personnel and National Guard members were losing their homes while deployed in war zones set off national outrage and prompted Congressional hearings in 2011. The case of Sgt. James B. Hurley, a disabled veteran whose home outside Hartford, Mich., was sold two months before he returned from Iraq, dragged through the courts for years, highlighting the devastating effect of foreclosures.

In 2011, JPMorgan settled claims that it inappropriately foreclosed on 18 military service members and overcharged 6,000. Bank of America and Morgan Stanley also struck a pact with the Justice Department to settle claims they foreclosed on 178 military members between 2006 and 2009. Sergeant Hurley has since reached a settlement with Deutsche Bank in his case.

When regulators forced them to take a close look at their loans, JPMorgan, Wells Fargo and Bank of America, the largest loan servicers, each discovered about 200 military members whose homes were wrongfully foreclosed on in 2009 and 2010, according to the people with direct knowledge of the findings. Citigroup had at least 100 such foreclosures. The foreclosures violate the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, a federal law requiring banks to obtain court orders before foreclosing on active-duty members.

“It’s absolutely devastating to be 7,000 miles from your home fighting for this country and get a message that your family is being evicted,” said Col. John S. Odom Jr., a retired Air Force lawyer in Shreveport, La., who represents military members in foreclosure cases. “We have been sounding the alarms that the banks are illegally evicting the very men and women who are out there fighting for this country. This is a devastating confirmation of that.”

Is anyone really surprised?  Thanks for the bailout and fighting for America…now gimme the keys!

In Liberty,
Mike

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4 Comments

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  1. No draft = no sympathy for imperialist lackeys.

    Soldiers are reaping what they have sown.

    Deprive others of home = lose your own.

  2. Jeesh, did they not get the memo to put ALL their money into the stock market to recieve their share of the “wealth effect?” Gosh, get with it people.

  3. Oh, and everyday, soldiers can daytrade the market: go very long just before close and the magical ramp oocurs. And short PM’s every day a half hour before U.S. market opens. PM’s never go up, only down just pre-U.S. opening. Jeesh.

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