Anti-Euro Party in Germany Makes Significant Headway into Parliamentary Elections

I haven’t been paying all that much attention to Germany as of late considering the incredible amount of scandals that have been emanating from the Obama administration, in addition to its ridiculous and dangerous attempts to catalyze World War III. However, with parliamentary elections set for September 22, it appears there are some interesting things afoot.

In case you haven’t heard of it, a new party was formed in Germany on February 6, 2013. The party is known as the AfD, or the “Alternative for Germany.” It is strongly anti-Euro and has gained surprising strength in the polls despite its very brief history.

On a related note, reading this article made me think of a comment made by Angela Merkel the other day when she said:

This is my approach and you can say that I’m doing all these things because I’m really a European at heart.

I found this odd, because while I do not live on the continent, I have spent some time there and in all my travels I never once met a European. I’m wondering, does this species actually exist outside of the catering halls of Brussels? Where do they live?

Now for more on the Afd from Business Week:

German parliamentary elections are coming up on Sept. 22, and Chancellor Angela Merkel has a problem on her hands. A euro-skeptical political party known as AfD is rising in the polls and could deny her Christian Democratic Union and its coalition partners the majority they need to continue governing.

AfD, or Alternative for Germany, currently holds no seats in the Bundestag, and until recently it barely registered in public-opinion polls. But a survey released on Sept. 4 by the Forsa polling group showed it with 4 per cent support—just shy of the 5 per cent needed to win Bundestag representation. Peter Matuschek, Forsa’s chief political analyst, says the poll may have underestimated the party’s strength. Many supporters, he told Spiegel, “are too embarrassed to admit that they are planning to vote for the AfD,” which wants Greece, Spain, and other crisis-hit countries to leave the euro zone, and possibly break up the existing monetary union itself.

At first blush, Merkel seems to be in little danger. Support for her CDU and its coalition partners is currently running at about 45 per cent in the polls, well ahead of the roughly 36 per cent for the opposition SPD and its Green Party allies. Merkel’s big problem is that nearly all AfD supporters are defectors from her camp. If AfD tops 5 per cent in the Sept. 22 vote, she will have to bring the opposition SPD party into the governing coalition, as was the case from 2005 to 2009, predicts Roland Freudenstein, deputy director at the Centre for European Studies, a center-right think tank in Brussels. “The likelihood is that she remains chancellor, albeit maybe in a different coalition,” Freudenstein says.

Full article here.

In Liberty,
Mike

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6 thoughts on “Anti-Euro Party in Germany Makes Significant Headway into Parliamentary Elections

  1. Well, even if AfD will make it- it wont change much. CDU and the libertarians can be sure that the left winged SPD and the greens will support their euro decissions despite the AfD beeing in the Bundestag. It will just be a 2nd party-like now “Die Linke” (former a part of the ex-SED GDR structure) which opposes the not so called great coalition which rules europe right now. The next upcoming elections will be questionable cause if the AfD makes it now-their will be much more media attention for them and many more parlimant rights and support…
    p.s.:Europeans are like ppl from maryland or so…they call themselves USA citizens but not marylanders ;)

    i have no prob with pl from maryland- could have chosen delaware too ;)

    • This is not true, I was born in Eastern Europe, now living in Germany and I would sooner call my self a German(sic) than an European. There are NO “Europeans”. That’s like calling a Chinese person “Asian”, yes they are Asian but in Race only.

  2. howdy Mike, great job. i’m a us born ex-pat viewing the world for the past ten years in southern germany. the afd, like ukip in the uk is the next best hope for the extinction of that centralized monster that is the eu. unfortunately, the media here is much like the purchaed media in the usa and thus is not encouraging hope in new parties but rather licking the hands that feed them.

    afd will make a difference but the process in germany will be a bit slower than in other eu member states due to the fact that “awakening” is linearly connected perceived pain. in germany the pain of austerity has not been acutely felt yet but it is inevitable. merkel can hold back the tide only so long via maneuvering and obfuscation.

    for all of the positive attributes of the german people, risk taking is not amoung them nor is protesting authority except for a very small and often ideology driven minority. but hope survives.

  3. I agree, we do not call ourselves “European”, and I tell you, many of us did not forget what German peoples did just few decades ago, we can have German friends and love them, but we do not trust them as a nation. In Europe we have different story, culture, food and habits. We have only one think in common: loving euro politicians… it is their guarantee for never ending power and money (do you know how much people working in Bruxelles earn?…). You saw what happened to Le pen as soon as she was speaking of living the euro? I do not think AfD will do much.

  4. Mike, FYI concerning what “European” means when said by e.g Merkel in German or by another German politican

    She is not connoting
    1. an ethnicity
    2. a resident of a geographic zone

    as you may think.

    In German she likely said “ein guter Europäer”.

    In German post-1945 rhetoric this means a person who wants to subordinate the German national interest to that of the EU in the knowledge that only in this way can German interests be achieved. Because of German overreach 1933-45.

    This phrase is often used by both social democrats and mainstream conservatives. Helmut Kohl holding hands with Mitterrand over the war graves at Bitburg in 1985 is a good example of being a “good European”.

    There is an allegation that Germany only gave up resistance to the French idea of the Euro at Maastricht when it achieved (premature) recognition of Croatian independence as a reward, Croatia being to Germany much as Canada is to the USA.

    (NB: in Swiss German however, Europe (Europa) rarely means the Continent in geographic terms at all, but only the EU as an entity. This is initially puzzling for those who speak German German and then visit CH.)

  5. Spot on! The last chapter gives an excellent explanation for the German refusal to face the facts that endanger the prosperity of the country.

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